GIM Database

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GIM Advisory Board

The GIM Advisory Board formed the core of the GIM Initiative from the onset. For the first time, UNDP has been able to gather most of the key actors who are active in the space of private sector and development – often with different perspectives –, from bilateral development agencies to academic institutions and business associations. Since 2006, the Advisory Board has provided strategic guidance, invaluable inputs and overall legitimacy to the GIM Initiative, and the list will grow over time to include a greater representation of developing country institutions.

GIM Advisory Board

Agence Française de Développement
Ashoka
Business for Social Responsibility
Dalhousie University, Faculty of Management
ESSEC Business School, Institute for Research and Education on Negotiation in Europe
European Foundation for Management Development
Global Development Alliance, USAID
Grassroots Business Fund
Harvard Business School, Social Enterprise Initiative
Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government, Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative
Institute of Business, Trinidad & Tobago, University of West Indies
International Business Leaders Forum
International Chamber of Commerce
International Development Research Center
International Finance Corporation
Japan International Cooperation Agency
Johnson Graduate School of Management, Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise, Cornell University
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Private Sector Development Division
Overseas Development Institute, Programme on Business and Development Performance
Special Unit for South-South Cooperation (SU/SSC), UNDP
SNV Netherlands Development Organisation
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
United Nations Global Compact
United Nations Foundation
University of Michigan, Ross School of Business, William Davidson Institute
World Business Council for Sustainable Development
World Economic Forum
World Resources Institute

Agence Française de Développement

The French Development Agency (AFD) is a financial institution that is at the heart of France’s Development Assistance policy. Its mission is to finance development. Thanks to the broad line of financial tools that it has been able to engineer and enhance, AFD supports public authorities, the private sector and local associate networks, to implement a wide range of social and economic projects.

AFD’s actions in favor of economic growth and preservation of the environment fall directly within the framework of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). AFD also contributes to the preservation of Global Public Goods and can react to crisis situations. The Agency is also developing financial and intellectual partnerships with other donors and strives to increase French influence in the area of development.

AFD is involved in Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean Basin, in the Middle East, and in Overseas France, thanks to its network of agencies and its different subsidiaries. The AFD Group brings together more than a thousand agents that each day use their abilities and their know-how to underpin their commitment to development.

Ashoka

Ashoka is the global association of the world’s leading social entrepreneurs—men and women with system changing solutions for the world’s most urgent social problems. Since 1981, Ashoka has elected over 2,000 leading social entrepreneurs as Ashoka Fellows, providing them with living stipends, professional support, and access to a global network of peers in more than 60 countries. With its global community, Ashoka develops models for collaboration and design infrastructure needed to advance the field of social entrepreneurship and the citizen sector.

Business for Social Responsibility

Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) provides socially responsible business solutions to many of the world’s leading corporations. Headquartered in San Francisco and with offices in Europe and China, BSR is a non-profit business association that serves its 250 member companies and other Global 1000 enterprises. Through advisory services, conventions and research, BSR works with corporations and concerned stakeholders of all types to create a more just and sustainable global economy.

Since 1992, BSR has helped companies of all sizes and sectors to achieve success in ways that demonstrate respect for ethical values, people, communities and the environment. A leading global resource for the business community and thought leaders around the world, BSR equips its member companies with the expertise to design and implement successful, socially responsible business policies, practices and processes. BSR is uniquely positioned to promote cross-sector collaboration in ways that contribute to the advancement of corporate social responsibility and business success.

BSR also acts as a trusted intermediary between business and civil society. While understanding business and serving its needs, BSR maintains strong relationships with other key stakeholders and opinion formers in the civic and public sectors. Through these relationships, BSR provides companies with alternative viewpoints and engagement opportunities that help them better formulate decisions, positions and actions.

Dalhousie University, Faculty of Management

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie is the largest university in Nova Scotia and the major centre for graduate and professional studies in Atlantic Canada. Tracing its origins back to the Department of Commerce in the 1920s, the School of Business Administration serves about 1,300 students in its innovative undergraduate and MBA programmes. The School is one of four that make up the Faculty of Management.

The School’s thirty-seven full time faculty members teach and do research in a number of areas, including accounting, marketing management, financial management, human resources, quantitative decision making, management information systems, production and service management, law, international business, and business strategy. Links with other Schools in the Faculty of Management and the university support additional academic activities in areas such as environmental management, information systems & technology, marketing informatics, electronic commerce and risk management.

ESSEC Business School, Institute for Research and Education on Negotiation in Europe

Because of its achievements in research and training and its partnerships, IRENE is now considered as the leading academic center on negotiation in Europe.

IRENE is first a team success. About 50 academics and practitioners — from several fields of expertise, both private and public — collaborate to organize conferences, develop publications and cases, and deliver training for leaders in Europe and around the world. Second, it is a research success. Professors, researchers and doctoral students, in cooperation with practitioners, organize academic conferences and seminars where negotiation experts can meet. Third, it is a training success. Every year, more than 2,500 government officials, business leaders and decision-makers in the civil society are trained in negotiation, team building and leadership, mediation and conflict resolution. Fourth, it is built on strong partnerships with international institutions and corporations, at the global, regional and local levels. Fifth, it has a strong organization, building on the management expertise of ESSEC.

European Foundation for Management Development

EFMD is an international membership organization, based in Brussels, Belgium. With more than 650 member organizations from academia, business, public service and consultancy in 75 countries, EFMD provides a unique forum for information, research, networking and debate on innovation and best practice in management development. EFMD is recognized globally as an accreditation body of quality in management education and has established accreditation services for business schools, corporate universities and technology-enhanced learning programmes.

EFMD has over 30 years of experience in the coordination of projects & activities around the world that fosters an active dialogue and exchange between companies and academic organizations. In a proactive manner it contributes to a search for, and generation of, new ideas for a continual enhancement of management thinking and practices. EFMD initiates short events on highly topical issues bringing business executives and distinguished academics together, and provides an environment that leads to professional networking and bridges the divide between the academic & business world. EFMD also runs the European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS), which is the leading international system of quality assessment, improvement, and accreditation of higher education institutions in management and business administration.

Global Development Alliance, USAID

The Global Development Alliance (GDA) is USAID’s commitment to change the way we implement our assistance mandate. GDA mobilizes the ideas, efforts and resources of governments, businesses and civil society by forging public-private alliances to stimulate economic growth, develop businesses and workforces, address health and environmental issues, and expand access to education and technology.

Today, the private for-profit sector and the non-governmental sector are significant participants in the development process. The Global Development Alliance approach responds to this changed environment, and it extends USAID’s reach and effectiveness in meeting development objectives by combining its strengths with the resources and capabilities of other prominent actors.

Alliances incorporate a breadth of USAID and partner resources to arrive at solutions only available through pooled efforts. The resources united are as diverse as the alliances themselves, including technology and intellectual property rights, market creation, best practices, policy influence, in-country networks, and expertise in development programmes ranging from international trade to biodiversity protection. Together, the combination of complementary assets has encouraged innovative approaches, more effective problem solving and deeper impact. Importantly, public-private sector conversations almost always lead to a better understanding of the challenge.

Grassroots Business Fund

The Grassroots Business Fund was established through the restructuring of IFC’s Grassroots Business Initiative. GBF is committed to creating bottom-line solutions to poverty. It helps strengthen small scale entrepreneurship by building the capacity and performance of grassroots organizations that are strategically positioned to deliver strong social and economic impact.

GBF delivers a unique blend of financing and technical assistance that helps its clients create scalable businesses, achieve sustainability, and attract socially-minded investors. The Grassroots Business Fund helps organizations achieve the management capacity, transparency, high performance, and business discipline they need to attract investors and business partners.

Harvard Business School, Social Enterprise Initiative

Grounded in Harvard Business School’s mission to educate leaders who make a difference in the world, the Social Enterprise Initiative aims to inspire, educate, and support current and emerging leaders in all sectors to apply management skills to create social value.

Through an integrated approach to social enterprise-related teaching, research, and activities at HBS, the Social Enterprise Initiative engages with leaders in the nonprofit, for-profit, and public sectors to generate and disseminate practicable resources, tools, and knowledge with the ultimate goal of bettering society.

The Social Enterprise Initiative’s strategic objectives range from building the world’s best faculty dedicated to social enterprise research and teaching to providing learning experiences that not only increase the effectiveness of social-sector executives, but also tap into the potential for social value creation among our entire community of students and alumni.

Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government, Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative

The Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative at the Kennedy School of Government is a multi-disciplinary and multi-stakeholder programme that seeks to study and enhance the public contributions of private enterprise. It explores the intersection of corporate responsibility, corporate governance, public policy, and international development. It bridges theory and practice, builds leadership skills, and supports constructive dialogue and collaboration among business, government, civil society and academics. It was founded in 2004 with the support of Walter H. Shorenstein, Chevron Corporation, The Coca-Cola Company, and General Motors.

The CSR Initiative efforts are dedicated to: research conducted by Harvard faculty, fellows, and students, in collaboration with external practitioner experts and organizations; dialogues and workshops that convene leaders from business, government, civil society, academia, and the media around emerging trends and critical dilemmas in corporate social responsibility; education that builds relevant skills among the next generation of public and private sector leaders; outreach that shares research findings and conclusions from dialogues with policymakers, business leaders, academics, investors, and the media.

Institute of Business, University of West Indies, Trinidad & Tobago

The Institute of Business (IOB)’s mission since its inception has been to be the premier facilitator for the development of high performing organizations in Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean region, empowering people and organizations to optimise their performance capability and international competitiveness.

The IOB engages in training and consultancy in a range of subject areas, from the Strategic Management of Change and New Leadership Requirements, to Understanding the Marketing Revolution. The Institute also offers in-company consultancy services geared towards working with managers to help them identify organizational goals and strategies, as well as to implement specific plans of action.

In keeping with its mission, the IOB has developed ties with several local and international institutions. The Institute has significant working relationships with private sector organizations throughout the Caribbean, as well as key regional institutions.

International Business Leaders Forum

The International Business Leaders Forum (IBLF) works with business, governments and civil society to enhance the contribution that companies can make to sustainable development. It is an independent, not-for-profit organization currently supported by over 100 of the world’s leading businesses.

IBLF provides strategic counsel to companies to enable them to understand and respond to the development challenges that they face, particularly when operating in transition and emerging economies. As well as managing a number of programmes that provide businesses with opportunities to directly enhance their impact on society, IBLF helps businesses connect with other organizations and develop successful cross-sector partnerships.

Since 1990, and with the support of its President, HRH The Prince of Wales, IBLF has worked in over 90 countries. Its work benefits from long-term relationships with regional networks across the world, many of which IBLF has helped to establish or strengthen. IBLF’s current areas of work include raising sustainable business standards, improving prospects for enterprise and employment, and enabling companies to contribute to health and human development issues.

International Chamber of Commerce

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is the voice of world business championing the global economy as a force for economic growth, job creation and prosperity. Because national economies are now so closely interwoven, government decisions have far stronger international repercussions than in the past. ICC — the world’s only truly global business organization responds by being more assertive in expressing business views.

ICC activities cover a broad spectrum, from arbitration and dispute resolution to making the case for open trade and the market economy system, business self-regulation, fighting corruption or combating commercial crime. ICC has direct access to national governments all over the world through its national committees. The organization’s Paris-based international secretariat feeds business views into intergovernmental organizations on issues that directly affect business operations.

International Development Research Center

IDRC is a Crown corporation created by the Parliament of Canada in 1970 to help developing countries use science and technology to find practical, long-term solutions to the social, economic, and environmental problems they face. Our support is directed toward creating a local research community whose work will build healthier, more equitable, and more prosperous societies. IDRC funds applied research by researchers in developing countries on the problems they identify as crucial to their communities; provides expert advice to those researchers; and builds local capacity in developing countries to undertake research and innovate.

International Finance Corporation

The International Finance Corporation (IFC) is a member of the World Bank Group. The creation of IFC in 1956 represented the first step by the global community to foster private sector investment in developing nations.

IFC’s vision, values, and purpose promote sustainable private sector investment in developing countries, helping to reduce poverty and improve people’s lives. IFC provides loans, equity, structured finance and risk management products, and advisory services to build the private sector in developing countries.

IFC has 179 member countries, which collectively determine its policies and approve investments. IFC’s corporate powers are vested in a Board of Governors, to which each country appoints a governor, generally the minister of finance or an equivalent.

Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

The role of the new Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) is to effectively provide creative, highly effective support for the process of “inclusive and dynamic development”. JICA’s missions are to address the global agenda, reduce poverty through equitable growth, improve governance, and achieve human security. Its work is based on four strategies: integrated assistance, seamless assistance, the promotion of development partnerships, and the enhancement of research and knowledge-sharing.

Johnson Graduate School of Management, Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise, Cornell University

At the Center for Sustainable Global Enterprise (CSGE), innovative research and teaching programmes generate and disseminate cutting-edge ways for private enterprises to achieve unparalleled financial success. Sustainable global enterprise is a management approach that frames social and environmental challenges as unmet market needs that can be addressed with business solutions. This straightforward approach enables the Johnson School to build robust MBA and executive programmes in business and sustainability based on innovation and entrepreneurship. This sets it apart from most other management programmes focused on corporate social responsibility (CSR), environmental management, ethical decision making, values-based management, and philanthropy.

Combining the business and entrepreneurship expertise of the Johnson School and the vast resources in science, technology, and the study of humanity at Cornell University, we are a powerful engine for advancing the global knowledge base in sustainable enterprise. The Center is organized around three main areas of activities: Sustainable Value Management; Low-Income Markets Development; and Sustainable Technological Innovation.

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Private Sector Development Division

Supporting development of a vibrant private sector has become an essential component of OECD’s efforts to boost the growth and stability of non-OECD economies. A significant part of this work has been entrusted to the Private Sector Development Division. Based on unique peer learning methods and instruments, the OECD provides policy analysis and advice to governments on implementing effective policy reforms. The aim is to encourage a sound business climate for investment, enhance productivity and competitiveness, support entrepreneurship and economic dynamism and ultimately raise living standards and alleviate poverty. The OECD has launched programmes which are both regional and country-specific. These programmes identify reform priorities, support implementation and benchmark progress.

Overseas Development Institute, Programme on Business and Development Performance

The Overseas Development Institute (ODI) is Britain’s leading independent think tank on international development and humanitarian issues. Its mission is to inspire and inform policy and practice which lead to the reduction of poverty, the alleviation of suffering and the achievement of sustainable livelihoods in developing countries. It does this by locking together high quality applied research, practical policy advice, and policy-focused dissemination and debate. ODI also works with partners in the public and private sectors, in both developing and developed countries.

SNV Netherlands Development Organisation

SNV is a Dutch social enterprise that provides innovative solutions and technical assistance to eliminate poverty and inequity. SNV was a Dutch government international cooperation agency for 40 years before privatizing in 2002. With 1,500+ professional staff in 32 developing countries worldwide, SNV provides strategic and contextualized advisory services to nearly 3,000 public, private and social sector organizations. SNV’s mission is fulfilled through two primary goals: 1) increasing production, income, and employment opportunities for the poor; and 2) enhancing their access to and quality of basic services.

Driven by the needs identified in each region, SNV works in basic services areas of health care, education, water and sanitation, renewable and sustainable energy, affordable housing, and financial services. SNV works hand-in-hand with key stakeholders in the business, government, and non-government / community sectors to build local capacity for long-term impact. SNV has a strong record in the promotion of good governance policies through public-private partnerships, effective micro-meso-macro level linkages, and policies that create a favorable environment for both development and the social and economic inclusion of the poor.

Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, UNDP

The Special Unit for South-South Cooperation (SU/SSC) was established by the UN General Assembly in 1978. Hosted in UNDP, its primary mandate is to promote, coordinate and support South-South and triangular cooperation on a Global and United Nations system-wide basis. The Special Unit receives policy directives and guidance from the General Assembly High-Level Committee on South-South Cooperation (HLC). The Special Unit serves as the HLC’s full Secretariat, preparing all substantive reports. SU/SSC organizes the United Nations Day for South-South Cooperation, celebrated annually on December 19, manages the UN Trust Fund for South-South Cooperation (UNFSC) and the Perez-Guerrero Trust Fund (PGTF) and also implements programmes financed by UNDP.

The work of the Special Unit is broadly organized into three focus areas: Policy, Dialogue & Development; Public Private Partnership; and Southern Development Exchange. SU/SSC operates by building and strengthening broad-based partnerships with a range of organizations, including the International Organization for Migration, UNCTAD, UNESCO, the World Bank, NGOs, the private sector, civil society and a wide variety of international development agencies. Where triangular cooperation is used, SU/SSC initiates, develops and assists in the execution of technical cooperation among developing countries that is supported financially by northern donors or by international organizations.

United Nations Environment Programme

UNEP’s mission is to provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing, and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations. As the United Nations system’s designated entity for addressing environmental issues at the global and regional level, UNEP’s mandate is to coordinate the development of environmental policy consensus by keeping the global environment under review and bringing emerging issues to the attention of governments and the international community for action.

United Nations Foundation

The UN Foundation was created in 1998 with entrepreneur and philanthropist Ted Turner’s historic $1 billion gift to support UN causes and activities. The UN Foundation builds and implements public-private partnerships to address the world’s most pressing problems, and broadens support for the UN through advocacy and public outreach. The UN Foundation is a public charity.

The UN Foundation strengthens and supports the UN and its causes through a blend of advocacy, grantmaking, and partnerships.

Advocacy. From the outset, it has worked to strengthen the relationship between the UN and the U.S. government. This effort—led by the UN Foundation’s sister organization, the Better World Fund—built the base for broader public outreach campaigns about the importance of international cooperation and a strong U.S.–UN relationship.

Grantmaking. Since its inception, the UN Foundation and Better World Fund have awarded grants amounting to over $900 million—including nearly $400 million in funds from dozens of partners and thousands of grassroots donors—in support of UN projects and activities in 115 countries.

Partnerships. As a platform for partnering with the UN, the UN Foundation helps corporations, foundations, governments, and individuals make a difference in the work the UN does. Its role in these partnerships, performed in close coordination with the UN Fund for International Partnerships (UNFIP), varies from catalyst to convener, advocate to grantmaker, and fiduciary to fundraising ally.

United Nations Global Compact

The Global Compact is a framework for businesses that are committed to aligning their operations and strategies with ten universally accepted principles in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption. As the world’s largest, global corporate citizenship initiative, the Global Compact is first and foremost concerned with exhibiting and building the social legitimacy of business and markets.

The Global Compact is a voluntary initiative aimed to mainstream the ten principles in business activities around the world, and catalyse actions in support of broader UN goals, such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). To achieve these objectives, the Global Compact offers facilitation and engagement through several mechanisms: Policy Dialogues, Learning, Local Networks, and Partnership Projects. The Global Compact is not a regulatory instrument but a network that relies on public accountability, transparency and the enlightened self-interest of companies, labour and civil society to initiate and share substantive action in pursuing its principles.

The Global Compact involves all the relevant social actors: governments, who defined the principles on which the initiative is based; companies, whose actions it seeks to influence; labour, in whose hands the concrete process of global production takes place; civil society organizations, representing the wider community of stakeholders; and the United Nations, as an authoritative convener and facilitator.

University of Michigan, Ross School of Business, William Davidson Institute

Created in 1992, the William Davidson Institute is a non-profit, independent, research and educational institute dedicated to developing and disseminating expertise on issues affecting firms in transition & emerging market economies. Integrating research, executive education, and practical project-based assistance, the Institute generates knowledge and offers unique educational opportunities to individuals as well as indigenous and multinational companies operating in transitional economies. It provides a forum for business leaders and public policy makers to discuss issues affecting the environment in which these companies operate.

The objective of the Institute’s educational and research programmes is to develop knowledge and capability that helps improve the effectiveness of firms and social welfare in these economies. Partnerships are formed with companies, institutions, and individuals around the world who collectively share their knowledge and resources to promote successful economic transition.

World Business Council for Sustainable Development

The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) is a CEO-led, global association of some 200 companies dealing exclusively with business and sustainable development. Its mission is to provide business leadership as a catalyst for change toward sustainable development, and to support the business license to operate, innovate and grow in a world increasingly shaped by sustainable development issues.

WBCSD provides a platform for companies to explore sustainable development, share knowledge, experiences and best practices, and to advocate business positions on these issues in a variety of forums, working with governments, non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations. Members are drawn from more than 35 countries and 20 major industrial sectors. The Council also benefits from a global network of about 55 national and regional business councils and regional partners.

WBCSD’s objectives are to be a leading business advocate on sustainable development; participate in policy development to create the right framework conditions for business to make an effective contribution to sustainable human progress; develop and promote the business case for sustainable development; demonstrate the business contribution to sustainable development solutions and share leading edge practices among members; and contribute to a sustainable future for developing nations and nations in transition. In order to achieve this, the Council focuses on four key areas: energy and climate; development; the business role; and ecosystems.

World Economic Forum

The World Economic Forum is an independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging leaders in partnerships to shape global, regional and industry agendas. Incorporated as a foundation in 1971, and based in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Economic Forum is impartial and not-for-profit; it is tied to no political, partisan or national interests. The World Economic Forum is under the supervision of the Swiss Federal Government. Its members represent the world’s 1,000 leading companies.

World Resources Institute

The World Resources Institute (WRI) is an environmental think tank that goes beyond research to find practical ways to protect the earth and improve people’s lives. Its mission is to move human society to live in ways that protect Earth’s environment and its capacity to provide for the needs and aspirations of current and future generations.

Because people are inspired by ideas, empowered by knowledge, and moved to change by greater understanding, WRI provides—and helps other institutions provide—objective information and practical proposals for policy and institutional change that will foster environmentally sound, socially equitable development. WRI organizes its work around four key goals: People & Ecosystems; Access; Climate Protection; and Markets & Enterprise.